Tag: particle

  • 은/는 (topic particle)

    N + 은/는 Appending 은/는 to a noun denotes the topic of the sentence. When the noun ends in a consonant, the ending 은 is used. When the noun ends in a vowel, 는 is used. The topic particle is used to specify what you are talking about, or in contrast to other things. This…

  • 에,에서 (location, time)

    location/time + 에/에서 에 is a particle used to mark location, time or other static situations. 에서 is used to mark locations where some action is happening. 에 roughly corresponds to ‘at,to,in,of,by’, and it usually attached to the location or situation it is marking. 에서 is used the same way, except an action or event…

  • 이/가 (subject particle)

    N + 이/가 Appending 이/가 to a noun denotes the subject of the sentence. When the noun ends in a consonant, the ending 이 is used. When the noun ends in a vowel, 가 is used. The subject particle is used to indicate the subject of the sentence. This is a more general usage than…

  • 을/를 (object particle)

    N + 을/를 Appending 을/를 to a noun denotes the object of the sentence. When the noun ends in a consonant, the ending 을 is used. When the noun ends in a vowel, 를 is used. The object particle is usually used to indicate specifically which noun in the sentence is being acted on by…

  • 들, 의 (plural, possession)

    I’m going to introduce two noun particles this time. One, -들, is attached to a noun to make it plural. Two, -의, is attached to a noun to signify possession by that noun. N + 들 1. -들 is attached to a noun to make that noun plural, but this is only to emphasize plurality,…

  • (으)시 (honorific particle)

    When we want to ask someone to do something or make an imperative action, and we don’t know that person well and/or they are older than us, then we need to use the honorific particle (으)시. V + 세요 1. When we are speaking in present tense, using the present verb conjugations (아/어/여) then we…