Categories
Politics

Why do some overseas Chinese desire to see China collapse and fail?

I’m a first generation Chinese immigrant. I was born in China but grew up and educated in the West (Canada).

I don’t want to see China collapse and fail at all, my main concern is the actions that the CCP has taken in recent years has resulted in quite concerning consequences.

The Hu Jintao years were great for China, that was when China became a major world power, the 2008 Beijing Olympics really being the point where I could say wow China has come a long way and now they are on the world stage, caught up to Japan and Korea technology wise, and catching up to the US GDP wise. At that time Chinese were still quite humble about themselves and saw a desire to improve their country.

But after Hu stepped down and Xi Jinping took over, I saw a much more protectionist shift.

Websites blocked in mainland China – Wikipedia

Check out this list of websites blocked in China, and take note of how many of those websites were blocked post 2011 when Xi Jinping came to power. That’s most of the list. Now if you go to China as a tourist, 95% of your apps and websites will probably be blocked. You also won’t be able to use your credit cards anymore, since China is now largely cashless. It’s basically a big F U to foreigners when you go to China.

I myself saw a huge difference when I went to Shanghai first in 2011, then last year in 2018. Back then, I could still access my websites and apps, there was more friendliness to foreigners, and I didn’t sense as much materialism or arrogance back then. Then last year I went back, and although technology has improved a lot – the people have gotten more unfriendly, being a foreigner made you a target, everyone was very materialistic and judged you if you didn’t support China etc

Since Xi took over and in recent years, China has gotten increasingly more aggressive when it comes to blocking or censoring foreign websites and apps. They’ve gotten much more politically sensitive and eager to ban or boycott foreign companies or persons (notably Korea, Japan, Canada and US all suffered some kind of ban or boycott in recent years).

I can see the motivation for Xi Jinping’s approach – which is to protect the Chinese industry and people – but I also think its unhealthy for the people. Because of the degree of censorship, anti-Western bias played by Chinese media and political sensitivity in China these days, Chinese have become more and more nationalistic, less humble and notably, anti-Western, especially compared to the Hu Jintao era.

Now all it takes to get yourself banned from China is to is to be on good terms with the US (Korea, Canada), say something about Hong Kong (NBA, various celebrities, etc) or criticize their human rights abuses (Soccer club Arsenal, South Park etc) or mentioning Winnie the Pooh, Tibet, Taiwan etc any number of things will get yourself banned and criticized on Chinese social media.

Take a look on Quora for example, or other social media (Chinese have to use VPN to access Western social media) and all I see are anti-Western answers and comments saying how Western democracy has failed, Americans are arrogant, theres a anti-Chinese conspiracy going on, Westerners want China to fail (i.e this very question is an example of that), Westerners are all brainwashed to hate China, Americans are hypocrites etc that’s all I see.

I don’t think its healthy to have this anti-Western, pro-Chinese sentiment going on at this degree, and that’s led to Chinese losing their humility and lose sight of what made them improve from the 1990s in the first place which is the ability to self-criticize, learn from their mistakes and improve their country.

What a marked difference from the Hu Jintao era. Now it’s all about ‘China is the best country in the world, we have the best economy, we are allowed to bully other countries because America does it, and anyone who criticizes us must have been brainwashed to do so’

This is a rather concerning development, and its a result of the protectionist / nationalistic push that China has taken in the Xi Jinping years. So it’s not that I have any desire to see China fail, I just disagree with the current Xi Jinping government and most Chinese netizens because I think that their actions in recent years is what leads to a lot of deserved criticism from foreigners and foreign countries, and they don’t seem to acknowledge it or want to change/improve that.

I supported China in the Hu Jintao era. Now, I don’t want to anymore – a lot of China’s uber nationalism, arrogance, hypocritical actions, banning/boycotting and economic bullying of other countries just makes me think of China as the Eastern version of the USA, and that just makes me ashamed to associate myself with Chinese in recent years. I thought China/Chinese were better than that and wanted to be better than USA/Americans, not become like them.

Lest Chinese forget, protectionism and arrogance is exactly what caused the Qing Dynasty to fail…

Categories
Politics

How do you feel about China purging all the non-Chinese hardware and software from their government operations?

I don’t really know how they can do it. Especially for software.

-Windows is a US product (Microsoft). It runs on more than 90%+ of computers.

-MacOS / iOS is also a US product (Apple)

-Microsoft Office is a US product

-Adobe Photoshop / Premiere / Final Cut Pro are US products

-Every popular programming language comes from the West except for Ruby. Python, Java, JavaScript, C, C++, etc were all invented in America and thus use English in their syntax.

-Almost all computer processors are designed by Intel or AMD (American)

-A good chunk of mobile processors are designed by Qualcomm (American). But China has HiSilicon so they might be ok here.

-Network communications including WIFI and Bluetooth modules are usually designed by Qualcomm, Broadcom or Intel (all American)

-A major player in managing team workflows is Atlassian which is an Australian company. They make Confluence and Jira, which are widely used by Chinese companies.

-So are communication tools like Slack and Skype (both American)

-RAM modules are usually made by SK Hynix (Korean), Kingston, Micron, Corsair etc (American)

-Hard drives are made by Hitachi, Toshiba (Japanese) or Samsung (Korean) or Seagate, WD (American)

-Audio chips are designed by Cirrus Logic, Wolfson, ESS Tech (American) or Asahi Kasei (Japan)

-Camera sensors are made by Sony (Japan)

-Displays are usually made by LG or Samsung (Korea)

-Motherboards are made by Asus, Gigabyte, Biostar, MSI (Taiwan)

-Graphics cards are designed by Intel, Nvidia or AMD (American)

Unless the article means banning products made in America (which there isn’t really many stuff made in USA anymore) and using strictly Chinese software (already happening) then that’s already been happening for past few years. Otherwise, its kinda impossible to ban software/hardware that are US designed since that’s in everything including the fabric of TCP/IP and the Internet itself which originally came from the US military.

 

Categories
Asia

What are the differences between Korean culture and Chinese culture?

A lot of differences. Some Chinese people say that Koreans “stole” Chinese culture but in some ways Korea is more Chinese than modern day China is.

-Koreans follow strict Confucian principles more than modern day Chinese do. This was true even back in the old times when Qing China and Joseon Korea existed. Koreans more than any other race stick together. They have this sense of ‘togetherness’ that does not exist to the same extent in modern day China. For example, somebody fall down in the street in China. Does anyone care? If it happened in Korea many people will help them. Do Chinese people really care about how other people act behave or look like? Maybe, but not to the same degree Koreans care.

-Loyalty and politeness. Korea takes a lot of cultural cues from Japan. This is one of them.. Korean companies value loyalty and expect the workers to stay at their company their whole life, just like in Japan. Its considered disloyal to quit the company or change companies. This does not happen in China. Also social cues like ‘nun-chi’ 눈치 in Korea its kind of like mannerisms towards older status people doesn’t really exist in China. Koreans bow when greeting each other. Chinese shake hands much like Westerners.

-During new years or Thanksgiving Koreans (particularly the women) will dress in their traditional outfits the hanbok 한복 and traditionally prepare food for their ancestors. A lot of Korean couples also wear hanbok just for taking pictures. You will not see Chinese wear their traditional outfits for things like this. The only times I see Chinese wear qipao or hanfu are for stage plays, Chinese opera or for traditional type weddings, thats it.

-Language. Korean language although they used to use Chinese characters, is very different now. They use honorifics in their language just like Japanese. So talking to older or younger person uses different grammar. Not so in Mandarin chinese.

-Work culture as I mentioned is pretty different. And its more competitive. Koreans have to learn either Chinese or Japanese in high school (in addition to studying 14+ hours a day but that’s something shared in common with China), and because appearance is valued so much in Korea, lots of girls get plastic surgery just to have a higher chance of getting a job there. Most students study English late into the night. You’ll find that the average Korean’s English is better than the averaged Chinese’s English skill. In China its not quite as competitive due to the following fact:

-Chinese are more ambitious and bigger risk takers than Koreans are. Koreans are very socially conservative more so than Chinese. They are risk averse and would rather suicide because they couldn’t get into Samsung or a famous university than start their own company. Chinese will find another way to get a job or start their own companies. They don’t give up quite as easily.

-Koreans care about appearance a lot like I mentioned. So almost all Korean girls wear makeup, dress up, and don’t wear glasses. Their fashion styles are totally different. In China its not quite as important, BUT they focus a lot more of showing off their wealth which means buying brand name items and owning homes is more important over there. Korean women wear more revealing clothes on average than Chinese women do. You’ll find that almost all the service women you see on Korean TV (broadcasters, reporters, etc) are attractive. Korea definitely places more emphasis on women’s appearances than China does. Their airline attendants and female golf players all look like models.

-Koreans are a more ‘traditional’ society… the women usually stay at home to take care of children, and do cooking and cleaning, while in China these duties are shared between the husband and wife. Gender equality is better in China due to communism..

-China is both more conservative and more liberal than Korea in some ways. It’s more liberal in the sense that gender equality is significantly better for women in China than in Korea. You’ll see many Chinese female CEOs, many Chinese women making as much or more than Chinese men, many Chinese women controlling the household etc whereas in Korea it’s almost always the men controlling the household, making money, being the CEO, making all the decisions etc. Abortion was legalized in China 30 years before Korea legalized it. Korea only legalized abortion in 2019. 

-But China is also more conservative in the sense that it censors a lot of sex/violence in entertainment which Korea only restricts but does not censor (in fact there are large numbers of Korean movies produced each year with sex scenes/violence in it), many Chinese will not talk about prostitution or sex whereas Koreans will acknowledge that prostitution exists in Korea and can talk about sex (albeit being an uncomfortable topic to discuss). the concept of Dowries exist in China but not in Korea. In China, the men always pay for everything, whereas in Korea the men pay for the majority of things but not everything.

-China is a very diverse country full of different races. Korea is 99% Korean. This means if you look different or act different, you are probably more likely to be noticed in Korea than in China. Korea is a very conformist society and people like to act and look the same. You will find less ‘crazy’ people in Korea than in other countries.

-Religion. 40% of Koreans are Christians and another 30% are Buddhist. Since Communism eliminated religion, very few Chinese are actually religious.

-Koreans like to export their culture to other countries like kpop or kdramas. They somewhat have to do this because their country is small and they have a limited market, so their global marketing skills are very developed. China has a big domestic market so not much need to export their music or fashion or entertainment, thats why you never about hear any Chinese pop conventions…

-Korean food is really just a subset of Chinese food. Chinese people eat almost anything. spicy things, fried things, insects, herbs, parts of frog or duck or dog or horse, etc almost ANYTHING. The cuisine really depends on part of China, but Korean food tends to be spicy, and their cuisine really is a subset of Chinese cuisine. I can say almost anything you eat in Korea can be found *somewhere* in China, but not the other way around. Very few Koreans eat actual Chinese food and instead eat “Koreanized’ Chinese food. Jajeongmyeon is actually Korean food but they think its Chinese.

-Both countries are relatively safe compared to gun crazy America, but Korea is more safe. In China there is always risk of food poisoning, people stealing stuff, getting scammed etc. In Korea you can leave your phone on a table for hours and no one will take it. There was even one incident where a Chinese female friend had forgotten her laptop in Korea and the Korean staff actually took the time to ship the laptop back to her in China. 

Thats just a few differences.. there are indeed MANY since I lived in both countries. Even tiny minor things, for example Koreans like to drink when they are together and Chinese play card games (Koreans dont play card games very often). Chinese don’t drink or party as much as Koreans do on average. Games like Mahjong are non-existent in Korea but everywhere in China. Koreans love their coffee and Chinese love tea. The amount of coffee and tea shops in both places are pretty much reversed.