Categories
Asia

What do you think of Chinese people?

Things I like about Chinese people:

-Hardworking

-Ambitious

-Confident

-Willing to take risks

-Brutal honesty

Things I don’t like about Chinese people:

-They lost their humility. Now they are too nationalistic, they always like to brag about China and how its better than other countries a lot, their cities, their food, their women etc and they get extremely defensive and offended when you say anything perceived as negative towards their country.

-Ironically even though they criticize other countries like USA/Japan/Korea etc all the time they cannot seem to take criticism of their own country well. They cannot seem to accept that their country has flaws. Yes we all know the CCP did some great things like lifting Chinese people out of poverty, but we also have to accept that they made some mistakes, especially in the past in the Mao-era with the Cultural Revolution and Great Leap Forward. Don’t jump down my throat for giving some honest feedback/criticism about your country. And they will inevitably talk about you are ‘brainwashed’ by Western media even though you are being the open minded one here.

-The whole society cares too much about wealth and is too materialistic. And before you say well other countries are materialistic too, no China is on a different level. They judge everyone by their wealth, everything is about money, money, money. How much do you make? What car do you have? You need a car and a house before marriage, and likely an expensive ring too. All this is crazy. You might find *some* Koreans and Japanese and Westerners like this, but definitely they will be in the minority and criticized if they think this way. For Chinese, this is considered a normal way of thinking.

-They think that being patriotic means supporting the CCP. Patriotism does NOT mean supporting the current government. Patriotism means love of your country, not love of the current government of your country. Many Chinese call me a ‘traitor’ because I don’t support the CCP and I say negative things about China. They don’t understand that you can still love China but be against the government. In America, over half the population opposes Trump, the current head of US government. Does that mean they do not love America? You must separate the concept of government from the country. Some of China’s greatest patriots were revolutionaries. Sun Yat-Sen was considered a great patriot, but opposed the Manchurian government in rule at the time. Most of Chinese dynasties were overthrown by someone who disliked the current government in rule. Heck, even Mao Zedong, the founder of the CCP, decided that the current government was not good and sought to overthrow it. Chinese must realize that going against your government does not mean you do not love your country.

-Gender inequality. I hate the BS ‘women hold up half the sky’ talk. If they hold up half the sky shouldn’t they pay for half of everything too? I don’t get why in the country with the lowest gender wage gap, the men still gotta pay for everything. Everything should either be equal and fair to both sexes, or if they insist men pay for everything, then they should do more than men at home or something like Koreans or Japanese women. Otherwise its not equal.

Categories
Asia

What do you think about China?

I guess I come from the unique perspective of having been to all the East Asian countries (China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea) and my feelings about China has changed because of this. Roughly 30% of my friends are Chinese and 40% Korean.

Before I lived in Korea, I was in China for a few months, visiting such places as Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, Suzhou, Hangzhou.

My impressions are that North China has really bad air.. and although Beijing has lots of history, it just wasn’t as interesting to me as Central and South China were. In contrast, Shanghai was probably the most modern city in China, and Suzhou and Hangzhou had some of the most beautiful natural scenery I’ve experienced.

I had lots of (mainland) Chinese friends in university, and also met Chinese people in China of course.

I feel that my feelings for Chinese people changed a lot after I met Japanese, Koreans and Taiwanese after I graduated university and started working and traveling to other Asian countries.

After having visited Japan and Taiwan and living in Korea for 2 years, here’s my observations:

-China is a great place for traveling and still has some of the most naturally beautiful places in the world.

-China is a massively diverse country full of different races and cultures

-Chinese food is very different from American Chinese food

-Chinese people are very blunt; For example they do not hesitate to mince words on anything really. Korea/Taiwan/Japan tend to soften their words in order not to offend people too much, but Chinese just straight up say whatever is on their mind. This is often taken as ‘harshness’ or ‘rude’ by other countries but I think this is just their culture.

-China has way better gender equality than any of its surrounding countries. And the women act very different from Korean/Japanese/Taiwanese women. They are less traditionally feminine, more assertive, more ambitious, and in a lot of cases can actually be more dominant than the men. It’s almost a role reversal compared to other countries, lol. It’s better in China to be a girl. Everything is paid for by the guys. The guys are pretty subservient to their gfs. The groom’s family pays for the wedding, not the bride. There’s a dowry that the men have to pay. And because of the skewed gender ratio, girls have the pick of the litter. Pretty big contrast to Korea/Japan where its pretty much the opposite. Heres a nice graphic that is based on the stereotypes:

-Chinese people are very prideful about their country, and more uniquely is how prideful they are about the specific region where they are from. A lot of times I would hear not’ Chinese ___ is the best’ but rather ‘Sichuan ___ is the best’ or ‘Beijing ___ is the best’ or ‘Shanghai __ is the best’. They like to boast a lot, and its not hard to see that they are biased in favor of China and their region on a lot of issues. It’s not so different from USA where Americans boast about their country too, but it is different from Taiwan/Japan/Korea where I don’t really hear them boasting about their country that often. Chinese people are not really aware of the culture differences between their country and Japan/Korea/Taiwan either, but that’s a forgivable point I suppose considering most Chinese have not been outside their country before.

-Chinese people seem to put a lot of faith into their government. I’ve seen them use extreme cases to justify certain questionable government decisions. For example, banning foreign websites: Foreigners think its extremely limiting to freedom but Chinese people think its a good thing because it protects their domestic industry. censoring sex/violence in entertainment: Foreigners think its extreme, Chinese people think that having sex/violence in entertainment will lead to people becoming depraved criminals. censoring social media: Foreigners think it limits freedom, Chinese people think having a free social media is too crazy and chaotic and unstable. The government makes them wear ugly track outfits for school. Foreigners think Korean/Japanese school uniforms look better. Chinese people think its distracts them from studying and looks too sexy. Chinese people seem to place a premium on stability and harmony over freedom and flexibility, I think.

-Chinese people are very results driven, sometimes to the detriment of other qualities. You’ll notice that in whatever they do, Chinese care solely about the end result and how effective it is. If you look at Japan and Korea, they also care about other things like the visuals, the aesthetics, the process, the technique etc. This can pervade in so many different ways too, Chinese food focus solely on whether or not it is delicious. Korean/Japanese care about how the food is prepared as well. Chinese female sports players focus only on being good at what they do. Korean/Japanese female sports players focus on looking good, in addition to being good at what they do. Chinese students focus on getting good grades. Korean/Japanese students focus on looking good, in addition to getting good grades. When Chinese design phones, they make the phones have really good specs for a really good price. When Apple or Sony design phones, they care about the materials and crafting process as well as the specs. See the difference?

-Chinese are very wealth driven. Now you may say well every person cares about wealth and being rich right? Of course everyone wants to be rich, but not everyone makes it the sole overriding goal of their entire existence the way Chinese do. Everything Chinese do is based on how to make the most money, which items to spend money on that will show off the most wealth, etc. The whole society is driven by how much wealth you have. They judge people based purely on their wealth. That is not the case in Korea, Japan, Taiwan or Western countries actually. It’s easy to say that some parts of the US like Beverly Hills are pretty materialistic, but you can’t say that about the entire country. China on the other hand… I can confidently say that anywhere in the country you will be judged by your wealth and what you own.

-Japan is Tang Chinese culture, Korea is Ming Chinese culture, Taiwan is ROC culture, and China is its own culture. I find China the most westernized in culture out of all of them. For example, China is the least traditionally Confucist out of those countries, they have mostly done away with traditional ceremonies, religion, outfits (Chinese rarely wear Qipao compared to Japan’s Kimono or Korea’s Hanbok), and their fashion style is more similar to Westerners (i.e casual style) than to Koreans or Japanese. Perhaps this isn’t surprising since China underwent massive revolutions compared to those other countries.

-Most Chinese are clean, nice and polite, but perhaps not to the same extent as Taiwan, Korea or Japan. My ranking of cleanliness / politeness in general is Japanese (TOO polite to a fault) > Taiwan > Korea > China.

-Censorship. This is more of a problem for foreigners than native residents, but just be aware that unlike Japan/Korea/Taiwan, you need to use a VPN to use most sites in China, and they censor violent/sexual content. Too much so, IMO.

-Cost of living. Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo are in the top tier of expensive cities to live in the world. In smaller Chinese cities, it is much cheaper. Seoul is a tier cheaper than those cities, and Taipei has the lowest cost of living amongst all the major capitals.

-China has the most job opportunities, and the best place to start a company, by far. Shenzhen and Beijing are economic powerhouses for IT. Korea’s job market is too competitive (there’s a reason why they have #1 suicide rate), Japan’s economy is stagnant and Taiwan’s economy is also stagnant. If you are looking for work as a foreigner, China is the best.

– Safety wise, all East Asian countries are safer than America. No comparison really. Very few mass shootings and gun murders if at all. In China you do have to be more careful of scams and thieves but its still relatively safe. In terms of safety I rank like this: Japan (zero gun deaths a year. seriously.) > Korea/Taiwan > China

-Technology. Again, ALL of these countries have great technology. Japan is famous for its tech companies, robots and micro electronics (Sony, Canon, Fujitsu, Toshiba, Panasonic, Nintendo, etc too many to list). Taiwan is the #1 maker of computer hardware with such names as Asus, Acer, HTC, Gigabyte, MSI etc. Korea is home to electronic giants Samsung and LG. China doesn’t have the brand cache of those other companies but they are improving! Huawei, Lenovo, Xiaomi, ZTE are some of the companies that are rapidly catching up to Japan and Korea!

-Religion wise, because of China’s communist past, very few Chinese are religious, most Chinese are atheist. Taiwan and Japan are mostly Buddhist. Korea is uniquely a Christian country, perhaps relating to how socially conservative they are.

In general I think it really depends what you want but China has its pros and cons. I did a comparison between China and other East Asian countries because I feel that this is a unique perspective I can contribute to, if others are interested. I would say work opportunity, diversity and natural beauty China is #1. Japan for the super polite / clean culture with a unique flavor. Korea is a mix of Japan and China but is also the most socially conservative and traditionally Confucist out of all them. Taiwan is much smaller than any of those countries but is a mix of Japanese and Chinese culture. I almost want to say they are Chinese people but with the manners of Japanese people.

Let me know in the comments if I am missing any comparison.

Categories
General

What is the difference between instant noodles in Japan, Korea, China, and Taiwan?

I’m qualified to answer this since I’ve eaten a lot of instant noodle brands from all three countries.

They do tend to be quite different from each other, I can’t say that one is necessarily better than the other.

But in general

Japanese instant noodles (Nissin, Sapporo Ichiban, Maruchan, etc)

-the Noodles are normally wheat noodles and thin but not as thin as rice noodles.

-Reserved, traditional flavors. There is traditional japanese flavors such as shoyu (soy sauce), shio (salt) and miso, the original ramen flavors. These might be considered quite plain flavors for Koreans and Chinese but they are traditional to Japanese and Japanese do not tend to experiment with any wild or unnecessary flavors, only on what has worked for them (Instant noodles were invented in Japan and has been largely the same for 7 decades in their country).

-there are rarely more than 1 seasoning packet. Again, Japanese noodles keep it simple.

Korean instant noodles (Samyang, Nong Shim, Paldo etc)

-Noodles are alot thicker than Chinese and Japanese noodles. Almost Udon-like.

-They tend to be spicy, like the famous Shin Ramyun or the recently trending Buldak Bokkeumyeon.

-Kimchi flavors are abundant. Some brands even add a packet of kimchi (either dehydrated or moisture sealed) to add.

-Korean noodles also keep the packets rather simple with usually 1–2 seasoning packets but they may add in gochujang or kimchi as I mentioned.

Chinese Instant Noodles (too many brands to list, I like Baijia though)

-Noodles tend to be thinner than both Japanese and Korean noodles. They use vermicelli or rice noodles a lot. Sometimes also thicker fried noodles are used.

-The flavor is varied, some can be spicy (or Mala, based on Sichuan peppers), and some can be sweet or sour or mild. Chinese noodle flavors run the whole gamut.

-The number of packets can be large, sometimes including giant packets of pickled vegetables and lots of packets of soy sauce or chili oil. Chinese noodles definitely give you bang for the buck.

I would also like to throw in Southeast Asian Instant Noodles (Monde Nissin, Mama, Indomie)

-The noodles are usually fried, and quite thin, maybe between Japanese and Chinese noodles in thin-ness.

-The packages are usually smaller than with Chinese/Japanese/Korean noodles. Not sure exactly the reason why, maybe Southeast Asians eat just a small portion at a time?

-Flavor of Southeast Asian noodles varies but they are regional. The famous Indomie Mi Goreng or Mama’s Tom Yum variants taste like the traditional SE Asian dishes they are based on with a hot and sour taste. They are spicy but not as much as either the Chinese Mala noodles or the Korean spicy noodles.

-The seasoning packets tend to include lots of spices and oils, like in the Chinese noodles, but usually do not include the big packets of vegetables.

-These noodles are also usually the cheapest, maybe due to their small size.

Happy instant noodle eating guys!

BTW I do have to give credit to Chinese instant noodles for some innovation. Some noodle bowls / boxes come with a heating packet so you don’t even need to boil water, you could literally just bring this box to a campsite and then take some water from a river and put it in here and start eating hot noodles. That’s just cool.

https://youtu.be/NyrCbjC9rnY