Categories
Korean Vocabulary

Basic Korean Adjectives

Ok, now let’s learn some basic adjectives (descriptive verbs).

Here a list of some basic Korean adjectives that you might find helpful.

COMMON ADJECTIVES
WORD TRANSLATION
크다 TO BE BIG
작다 TO BE SMALL
넓다 TO BE WIDE
좁다 TO BE NARROW
높다 TO BE HIGH
길다 TO BE LONG
짧다 TO BE SHORT
무겁다 TO BE HEAVY
가볍다 TO BE LIGHT
똥똥하다 TO BE FAT
깡마르다 TO BE SKINNY
좋다 TO BE GOOD
나쁘다 TO BE BAD
무섭다 TO BE SCARY
재밌다 TO BE FUNNY/INTERESTING
이상하다 TO BE WEIRD/STRANGE
이쁘다, 예쁘다, 아름답다 TO BE PRETTY/BEAUTIFUL
못생기다, 밉다 TO BE UGLY
많다 TO BE MANY
적다 TO BE FEW
두껍다 TO BE THICK
얇다 TO BE THIN
시끄롭다 TO BE LOUD/NOISY
조용하다 TO BE QUIET
안전하다 TO BE SAFE
위험하다 TO BE DANGEROUS
복잡하다 TO BE COMPLEX
간단하다 TO BE SIMPLE
수줍다 TO BE SHY
피곤하다, 고단하다, 노곤하다 TO BE TIRED
다르다 TO BE DIFFERENT
같다 TO BE THE SAME
비슷하다 TO BE SIMILAR
중요하다 TO BE IMPORTANT
즐겁다 TO BE ENJOYABLE, TO BE PLEASANT
덥다 TO BE HOT (WEATHER)
춥다 TO BE COLD (WEATHER)
싸다 TO BE CHEAP
비싸다 TO BE EXPENSIVE
기쁘다, 행복하다, 유쾌하다 TO BE HAPPY
슬프다 TO BE SAD
쉽다 TO BE EASY
어렵다 TO BE DIFFICULT
착하다 TO BE NICE
똑똑하다, 영민하다, 영리하다, 명석하다 TO BE INTELLIGENT/SMART
귀엽다 TO BE CUTE
젊다, 어리다 TO BE YOUNG
늙다 TO BE OLD
튼튼하다, 강하다, 튼실하다 TO BE STRONG
약하다 TO BE WEAK
Categories
Grammar Lesson 3 Korean

(ㄴ/은),는,(ㄹ/을),던 (past, present, future) particles, verbs into adjectives

We already know how to make past tense, present tense and future tense with verbs.
Now let’s learn how to use those tenses to modify nouns.
We’ve already learned how to turn verbs into nouns, but we haven’t discussed how to do it with different tenses, and how they modify nouns.

V + 는

1. We already learned how to make a present tense verb a noun. The common way of doing this is appending ‘는 것’ to the verb. To make a present tense verb an adjective, we just conjugate it with ‘는’. The particle ‘는’ before a noun in general means you are talking about the present (This particle is also used as the topic particle, but that’s unrelated to this).
If we want to express the fact that we are doing something in present tense, we just say [verb] + ‘는 거예요’ or ‘는 거야 (casual)’.

공부해야하는 것이 있어요. – There’s things I need to study (presently).

한국어 공부하는거예요. I’m studying Korean (talking about the fact of doing it presently). This is sort of similar to saying 한국어 공부해요, except more focusing on the fact.

V + (ㄴ/은)

2. To make a past tense verb an adjective, we conjugate it with ‘ㄴ/은’. The particle ‘ㄴ/은’ before a noun in general means you are talking about the past.
If we want to express the fact that we did something in past tense, we just say [verb] + ‘ㄴ/은 거예요’ or ‘ㄴ/은 거야 (casual)’.

공부해야한 것은 많아요. – I had a lot of things I had to study.

언제 여기에 온거예요? = When did you come here? – (talking about the fact of coming here in the past). This is sort of similar to saying 언제 왔어요? except more focusing on the fact.

V + (ㄹ/을)

3. To make a future tense verb an adjective, we conjugate it with ‘ㄹ/을’. The particle ‘ㄹ/을’ before a noun in general means you are talking about the future.
If we want to express the fact that we will do something in future tense, we just say [verb] + ‘ㄹ/을 거예요’ or ‘ㄹ/을 거야 (casual)’.

공부해야할 것은 많아요. – I have a lot of things I should study for.

언제 갈거예요? = When will you go? – (this is the standard future tense we already learned).

V + (았/었/였)던

4. In addition, there is another past tense particle that is slightly different than using ‘ㄴ/은’. You may have seen the particle ‘던’ attached to verbs/adjectives before. This is emphasizing the fact that something used to be that way, but not anymore. The verb it is attached to can either be in present form (아/어/여) or past form (았/었/였) to emphasize that its in the past.

했던 친구들이 지금은 다 외국에 살아요. – The friends that I used to know are now living overseas.

예전에 제가 자주 가던 곳이에요. – This is the place I used to go to before.

V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)거예요
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)건데요
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)거죠
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)걸까요?
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)건가요?

These endings are similar to using their ‘regular’ counterparts.
V + (ㄴ/은)거예요 is similar to the regular past tense V + 았/었/였요.
V + 는거예요 is similar to the regular present tense V + 아/어/여요.
V + (ㄹ/을)거예요 is regular future tense.
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)건데요 is similar to the ending 는데.
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)거죠 is similar to the ending .
V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)걸까요? and V + (ㄴ/은,는,ㄹ/을)건가요? are question endings similar to the question endings 까요? and 가요?

Categories
Grammar Lesson 3 Korean

게,히,이,(적)으로 Adverbs

There are several ways to make an adverb in Korean.
Generally, the most common way is to conjugate the adjective with the ending ‘게’, but other words may conjugate with ‘히’, ‘이’, or ‘으로’, depending on the verb.

DV + 게

1. ‘게’ is the most common way of making an adverb. You just take a descriptive verb (adjective), remove the stem, and append 게.

맛있 먹어요! – Eat deliciously!

안전하 걸으세요! – Walk safely!

DV + 히/이

2. ‘히’ and ‘이’ appear sometimes, but not as often. It depends on the verb, as some verbs use ‘히’ and ‘이’ endings much more naturally than ‘게’.

천천 말해주세요! – Speak slowly!

한국어 많 들었어요. – I heard a lot of Korean.

N + 적 + 으로

3. ‘으로’ is only used with a specific set of adjectives. Mainly, those that end in ‘적’. Attaching ‘적’ is equivalent to adding ‘-ness’ to a noun, and appending ‘으로’ to that makes it an adverb.

일반 (general) + 적 (general-ness) + 으로 = Generally

사적 (personal) 으로 = Personally

기본 (basic) + 적 (basic-ness) + 으로 = Basically